BeforeYourNext Birthday-DeniseFisher’s Blog

Get fit, get organized, & get your financial affairs in order

Archive for the ‘Exercise’ Category

Free Coldplay Exercise Soundtrack You Can Download

Posted by denisefisher on May 20, 2009

image Ok, it’s not really intended to be an exercise soundtrack, but Coldplay is offering a free album of their music, and I defy you to crank it up and not want to dance or exercise. The title of the album even gives you instructions for beginning dance or exercise steps – it’s called Left Right Left Right Left. It includes these songs:

Glass of Water
42
Clocks
Strawberry Swing
Hardest Part/Postcards from Far Away
Viva La Vida
Death Will Never Conquer
Fix You
Death and All His Friends

An exercise workout doesn’t require a gym membership or even a pair of jogging shoes. Put on some tunes. Jump up and down; wave your hands over your head like you’re at a concert; and just exercise/dance like a crazy person. If you have a kid between the age of toddler and post-college you can both/all exercise dance to the music. If you have a teenager, you can dance around the house in front of their friends. Yeah, your kid might be embarrassed, but it will make for a good story and I bet that they’ll want to join in with the music.

Exercising with a musical playlist is one of my favorite ways to get physical activity and activate endorphins that’ll energize you for the day. And now you can get a great Coldplay playlist for free. It’s coming up on Memorial Day weekend, so think of this soundtrack as an alternative activity to sitting around eating cupcakes after the cookout. Crank up the music and get everyone dancing or exercising. Crazy fun, courtesy of Coldplay. Thanks guys!

Posted in Exercise, Fitness, Personal Style | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

10 Reasons To Take A 20-minute Walk in Your Neighborhood

Posted by denisefisher on February 25, 2009

Walking Feet

Approximately 80% of the US population lives in urban (or suburban) areas, where there are neighborhoods. I’m in this demographic, and these tips are written with these people in mind. But if you’re not living in such an environment, read through the list, note the benefits, and find ways to apply them to your situation.

10 Reasons to take a 20-minute walk in your neighborhood

1. Exercise
2. Know what’s going on
3. Social encounters
4. Vitamin D
5. Natural appetite suppressant
6. Day dreaming/idea gathering
7. Sensory awareness and appreciation
8. De-stressing
9. Solitude or partnership
10. Serendipity

1. Exercise
The physical benefits of exercising are the most obvious. You’ve heard these things before. You know you should get more exercise. I’ll skip all that. Just remember that a 20-minute walk in your neighborhood is a manageable physical activity. No special equipment or scheduling or other preparations are needed. Any amount of walking that you actually do is better than an intended 30-minute workout at the gym that never happens. It’s not an all or nothing proposition. Walking counts.

2. Know what’s going on
You’d be surprised at the amount of information you can gather about your neighborhood in the span of a 20-minute walk. You’ll find out when someone puts their house up for sale. You’ll be aware of construction or renovation projects that are going on or getting ready to start. You’ll see repairs being made to utilities (which might solve the mystery in your own house as to why all of your clocks and electronic appliances reset to 12:00). If you walk the neighborhood routinely, you’ll notice when someone gets a new car, see when someone’s putting up a new fence, or discover a beautiful antique table that someone is putting out for trash pick-up.

3. Social encounters
It’s always good to know who your neighbors are. I’ve come to appreciate this more as I’ve gotten older. Ideally, you’d like to be on friendly terms with whoever lives next to you, but even if it’s just a casual greeting as you pass each other coming and going, it’s better than nothing. If you’re out walking, you’re more likely to have such encounters with your next door neighbors and other residents in your vicinity. Beyond the polite salutations of “hi, how’s it going?” there should follow an actual introduction and maybe an exchange of phone numbers. The more you are seen and greeted by your neighbors, the more friendly and approachable you will be. Having an amicable relationship with those on your street comes in handy when you need someone to help jump-start your car or sign for a package when you’re at work during delivery hours. Being a good neighbor is a good policy. Being seen walking in the neighborhood is a good way to improve your status.

4. Vitamin D
Exposure to direct sunlight causes the body to create vitamin D. You can’t get this benefit if you’re inside, and you can’t get it through window glass in your car, home, or office. You need to be out in the sunshine during daylight hours, every couple of days. There are conflicting views and studies about how much is enough and how much is too much, and the scientific recommendations seem to change constantly. So be intuitive and moderate about your exposure to get a reasonable benefit without the detriment.

5. Natural appetite suppressant
There are several studies to suggest that exercise affects metabolism and suppresses appetite. Anecdotally, I’ve experienced this effect, and I’ve heard similar results from others who exercise regularly. Try if for yourself and see if you don’t notice a similar effect. What’s the worst that could happen?

6. Daydreaming/idea gathering
After walking for about 10 minutes — once I get into a rhythm and stop paying such close attention to my steps and my walking technique — I notice that my mind becomes relaxed and starts to drift off into a dreamlike state. I start to develop solutions to problems that I’ve set aside, and pieces of ideas begin to come together into innovative possibilities. This is most likely to happen when I walk by myself, and it’s both calming and exhilarating at the same time. Who wouldn’t want to experience that?

7. Sensory awareness and appreciation
When you walk consciously, and allow your senses to experience the world around you, you’ll find that there are all kinds of sights, sounds, and smells around that you miss when you’re hurrying off to one place or another. It can be a pleasant surprise to take in the fragrance of blossoms on a tree, charcoal grills being fired-up, or fresh laundry smells coming from a dryer vent. If you don’t stop to notice, you can miss the sounds of songbirds in the trees or the distant sound of someone playing piano near an open window. You can appreciate the bright colors of a flowering bush or the neatly manicured landscaping of a neighbor’s yard. It’s all good. Breathe deep and learn to adjust your attention so you don’t miss savoring these sensory experiences.

8. De-stressing
Walking is a great way to release tension in your muscles and allow the natural hormones that are released during exercise to calm your nerves. Deep breathing helps, as does good posture. Both of these can be enhanced by walking. And if you’re not stressed, you’ll probably experience less frustration and less yelling, so it’s got to be beneficial for relationships too. It’s always good to take time out to unwind and regain perspective. Did I mention that walking is also energizing and gives you momentum?

9. Solitude or partnership
Enjoying a few minutes of solitude or a few minutes of one-on-one time with your partner or child is a fabulous bonus you can get by walking your neighborhood. If you’re walking with someone, it allows for pleasant conversations of the day’s activities or discussions of upcoming plans. It’s an opportunity to build or maintain rapport and intimacy. Or it can be a time to be competitive, whimsical, or silly together. If your walk is taken without a walking partner, take the time to enjoy being alone with your own thoughts, unjudged and uninterrupted. You can choose which works best for you – solitude or partnership. Maybe mix it up from time to time.

10. Serendipity
You can’t plan for the unexpected or anticipate a spontaneous occurrence, but you can be aware and receptive for a serendipitous encounter. An open mind and a youthful sense of curiosity will reveal unimagined possibilities you could not have foreseen. Look for the sign.

Finally
I wish I could remember where I read this so I could cite it, but one guy described his two-step motivation technique for walking exercise this way:

1) Get shoes on.
2) Get on the other side of the door.

I love it! Sometimes, getting started is just that easy. So let’s do it. As soon as I finish writing this, I’m going to go out walking. Meet me on the other side of the door.

Posted in Exercise, Fitness, Personal Style | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Watch TV as a Productivity Tool

Posted by denisefisher on February 20, 2009

I know the title of this entry sounds counterintuitive, but hear me out  before you discard this as a valid suggestion. Also, I’m aware that there are purists out there who rebuke the whole notion of TV-watching and label it as a productivity killer, and I can appreciate their sentiments,Me on exercise ball watching TV - left side but I’m not one of them. Like many other luxuries and things that can be bad for you in excess, I prefer, instead, to consume TV programming mindfully, on purpose, in moderation, and to savor the experience. Now, on to the techniques.

Watch TV when it’s broadcast
VCRs, DVRs, TiVo, and on-demand programming make it convenient to watch TV on your schedule, at your leisure. And that’s ok when you want to be leisurely. But to get the productivity benefit, you need to get your chores done, or your errands run, or whatever project you’re working on completed, before your show comes on. Don’t underestimate the power of a deadline (even a TV show deadline). If I see that I have less than an hour before a show comes on that I want to watch, I can go to the store, get just what I need, and make it back home in time for the opening theme song. It’s amazing. It also causes me to be more efficient in my shopping and to just get what I came for. I don’t have time to browse or stroll the aisles, checking out new products or enticing bakery selections – I have to get the rest of my shopping done so I can get out of there and get home to watch my program!

Plan your TV viewing schedule for the week
If you review the TV listings in advance, you’ll be able to select the shows you want to watch, catch the PBS special about the Lincoln Assassination, know if the upcoming episode of The Office is a new show or one you’ve seen before, and know what time your favorite college team is playing this weekend. Some shows are rebroadcast multiple times, which gives you some flexibility and allows you to determine if the show time is a “must be on time” event, or a “preferred, but not mandatory” deadline. Real-time programming is especially subject to this planning. Sure, you can watch the rebroadcast or the highlights of the Super Bowl or the Academy Awards, but it’s not the same as seeing it live. If you have a TV viewing schedule for the week, you can coordinate it with your other activities. You can catch the one-time programs or premieres that you want to watch. And you can use the anticipation of an upcoming show to motivate you during the day and give you something to look forward to.

Make intentional TV-watching a special event
Before cable, before VCRs, back when there were only three major networks broadcasting shows and primetime viewing was each evening at 8 pm, people used to look forward to watching their favorite shows when they aired. The whole family would gather around the one TV in the house, get settled into their designated viewing seat (or floor space), and quiet the ambient noise to focus on the show. There was no tolerance for side conversations, game play, or walking around during the show. You sat and watched the program attentively, with full engagement as a shared experience, and with consideration for others. TV watching wasn’t part of a continuous bombardment of audio-visual stimulation. It was special.

If you watch TV as a planned event, rather than as a background distraction to fill the silence and vie for your attention while just hanging out, it can be something special and worth doing for you too. Plan to enjoy the activity as something you’ve intentionally chosen to do (assuming that turning on the TV just to see what’s on isn’t a default activity to occupy your time because you don’t have anything else planned). If you want to have a snack while you watch, consciously plan it as part of the special event. Don’t just grab a whole bag of chips and some dip or order a pizza to sit on the coffee table and be mindlessly devoured while your other senses are otherwise engaged. Plan the food and the serving size that you intend to consume. Slice up an apple into wedges, or prepare a fresh fruit mini-platter. make yourself a cup of tea or hot chocolate, or even scoop out a some almond fudge ice cream into a serving-size bowl. Allow yourself a splurge, if that’s what you had planned, but do it mindfully, and in moderation. Make the entire event a planned and special activity.

Be the star
This tip works best when you are the only one watching a show in the room, but it can also be done in the presence of others with whom you feel comfortable, and with whom you have a similar passion for the show. Some shows lend themselves to audience participation, at one level or another. And part of the savoring – and the productivity – of watching TV, comes from immersing yourself in the program. For example, when I used to watch “Dancing With The Stars”, I would literally twirl, kick, and dance around the living room with the dancers on TV. When I watch “The Biggest Loser,” I sit on my exercise ball and do various maneuvers, sometimes with hand weights, or I have a “big salad” that I prepared in advance, with the intention of enjoying it while I watch the contestants in some kind of temptation challenge.

When I watch some kind of moving documentary, I sit tall and start to emulate the confidence and courage of the admirable character being featured. And when it’s over, I make notes to schedule a time for sorting through my family photographs and other mementos. I use the burst of inspiration I experience to take steps toward a dream that’s important in my life. Watching Suze Orman makes me want to check my financial accounts and get my estate planning documents in order. This doesn’t apply to every show you might watch, but by being selective about your viewing habits, you can feed yourself with mostly healthy choices that nourish your soul and inspire your better nature. Who can seriously say that after watching a few day’s worth of the Olympics that they don’t feel inspired to become more physically active or join a gym? This is a great productivity tool for you; you just need to recognize it and use it to your advantage.

Posted in Exercise, Personal Style, Routines, Time Management | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

60 Ways To Save A Day Gone Wrong

Posted by denisefisher on February 12, 2009

A Day Gone Wrong Some days are better than others. Despite our best intentions to be productive, to be organized, to be mindful, some days just don’t turn out that way. We lack the will, the focus, or the motivation to get things done. Some days, it’s hard to even get started. What if you just don’t feel like it? After spinning our wheels and seeming to get nowhere, the day can start to seem like a total loss.

But wait. There’s hope.

If you had a list of Things To Do When You Don’t Know What To Do, you’d have options. It’s hard to come up with ideas – even simple ones – when you’re feeling overwhelmed or uninspired. On a better day, you can put together a list of your own. In the meantime, I’ll lend you some of mine. They’re simple tasks you can choose to do as an alternative when your best laid plans have gone awry. It’s a menu of “Plan B” options to salvage a day gone wrong. Even if you don’t regain your full momentum, at least you’ll get something done.

  1. Make the bed
  2. Wash a load of clothes
  3. Run the sweeper
  4. Water the plants
  5. Put away folded clothes
  6. Put away dishes
  7. Wash the sheets to hang out on the line to dry
  8. Polish shoes
  9. Clear off the table and set it for the next meal
  10. Clean the bathroom sink
  11. Check the mail
  12. Walk around the block
  13. Wash dishes
  14. Clear out & reorganize briefcase/backpack
  15. Sweep off the porch and steps
  16. Get clothes and gym bag ready for workout
  17. Clean the kitchen sink
  18. Walk around and inspect the outside of the house
  19. Pick up leaves, pine cones, and sticks from the driveway or yard
  20. Empty out the refrigerator crispers and reline with paper towels
  21. Clean out and organize the rest of the refrigerator or freezer or just a part of it
  22. Dust TV screens and computer monitors
  23. Clear off a flat surface – pick any one or more: desk top, entry table, night stand, dresser top, dining room table, kitchen counters, work table, bookshelf
  24. Straighten up and clean up the cat station and organize cat supplies
  25. Wipe out the inside of the microwave oven
  26. Empty the smaller wastebaskets around the house into the larger trash bag
  27. Find some junk mail, papers, magazines, expired paperwork to recycle
  28. Take out the trash or recycling
  29. Check your financial accounts
  30. Enter financial data for accounting into software program
  31. Inspect the condition of the car’s exterior (maybe check the tire pressure, oil & other fluids)
  32. See if there’s anything that needs to be cleared out of the car or trunk
  33. Vacuum out the car and wipe down surfaces
  34. Look through some storage space to see what you have and what might need to be done
  35. Chop vegetables, prepare lettuce for salad, or other food preparations
  36. Cook or bake something that will last for several days’ meals
  37. Check inventory levels and restock or add to shopping list, as needed (napkins, paper towels, TP, baggies, foils, wraps, trash bags, vacuum cleaner bags & belt, tissues, liquid soap, dishwashing detergent, laundry soap, stain treatment, bleach, household cleaners, refill water bottles, water pitcher, personal products, coin compartment in purse or car, checkbook, printer paper & cartridges, travel size cosmetic containers [shampoo, lotion, Q-tips, toothpaste, sunscreen, etc.], contact lenses & saline solution, light bulbs, batteries, birdfeeder, first aid kit, medications, vitamins)
  38. Take a power nap
  39. Do some type of personal grooming (tend to your nails, ears, feet, facial or body hair, hair color/length/style)
  40. Call your mother (or other deserving call recipient)
  41. Run an errand
  42. Go to the library
  43. Review your goals/personal mission statement/mantra
  44. Review your to do list
  45. Write and e-mail reply or a letter you’ve been putting off
  46. Clean one or more ceiling fans
  47. Clean the windows on the front door (and the finger prints around the door frame)
  48. Plan the details of a call you’ll make tomorrow – get the name, phone number, key points, and supporting documents you’ll need to have on hand
  49. Gather things together that you’ll need for a project you’re going to do tomorrow – set it up so that you’re ready to start
  50. Listen to an educational, inspirational, or informative podcast
  51. Clear your inbox
  52. Sort through some computer files and delete what you no longer need
  53. Meditate in a quiet space (possibly with some suitable music)
  54. Read something uplifting
  55. Ask someone else about their day, listen with empathy, and ask how you can help them out
  56. Send someone a text message or e-mail – out of the blue – to tell them something you admire about them
  57. Go to the yoga today website and do a yoga video
  58. Sort/organize/group/categorize … anything (bills or receipts to file, medicine cabinet, CDs or DVD collection, utensil drawer, spice cabinet, tool box, drawers of your night stand, jewelry or other accessories, stack of firewood or kindling, art supplies, lap drawer of the desk)
  59. Hold your baby (your little baby, your big baby, your sweetie baby, or your pet animal baby)
  60. Regroup and plan to get back up to speed tomorrow

Posted in Diet, Exercise, Finances, Fitness, Health, Organization, Personal Style, Routines, Spaces & Things, Time Management | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »