BeforeYourNext Birthday-DeniseFisher’s Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘Public Radio’

Productivity & Wardrobe Maintenance – OR – Why Doesn’t Stephen Covey or David Allen Ever Mention Laundry?

Posted by denisefisher on May 6, 2009

Ironing Man Have you ever noticed that all the productivity experts and best-selling authors on the subject of efficiency rarely, if ever, mention such basic topics as doing laundry or preparing meals? These are tasks that everyone needs to do frequently, on a regular basis (or they at least need to have someone else do these tasks for them, which I’m guessing is the case for the aforementioned authors). But for everyone who doesn’t have a secretary, personal assistant, and housekeeper, and still wants to be productive and efficient, you need to have an effective system for wardrobe maintenance. I’m assuming that anyone who’s reading this already has some sort of system for laundering their clothes. How’s that system working for you? It might be time to make some adjustments to your routine or tweak the details to streamline the process. Things may have changed in your life or in your living situation. You may have slipped into some less-than-optimal habits by continuing a “just for now” routine that you started long ago. You may have been doing your routine long enough that you now know what you’d like to change (if only someone would assign you a maintenance redesign project). Well, consider this a call to begin a mindful reassessment of your wardrobe maintenance system. In most cases, this will be a fairly easy task that you can undertake to make your system into something that’s not filled with drudgery or chaos. Who wouldn’t want that? I have four points to consider to help improve your wardrobe maintenance system:

+  Location

+  Supplies & Equipment

+  Space

+  Routine

You need to have a designated location where things are kept and processed during the maintenance routine. Remember the saying “a place for everything and everything in its place”? Well, the first part of that phrase is probably the more difficult of the two. And if you’re going to streamline your system, you might need to rethink the default locations you’re currently using. Don’t stick with a centralized laundry hamper in the hallway that the entire family has to use if it doesn’t work for you. Don’t force yourself to cram all of your dirty clothes into one basket, if you need more space or if you need additional containers for sorting. Think of yourself as the system designer for this process and make each element of it work in a way that naturally flows for you. If there are designated spaces for what you need to do, at the location you need to do it, and the supplies and equipment you need to use, it will be easier for you to develop a streamlined routine, and you’re more likely to sail through the process without moments of indecision or settling for what you’ve got to work with.

Consider these criteria for the aforementioned points.

+ Location

for clothes awaiting cleaning or repair – this might be a place where clothes are hung, or more likely, a hamper or clothes basket; preferably, near the source of that decision
where clothes are cleaned and repaired – this refers to where the do-it-yourself tasks are done as well as the take-it-somewhere tasks – where do you polish your shoes or sew on a button? have you located a designated shoe repair place or a place where you would go for alterations?
where clothes wait to be put away – not where stacks of clothes sit for weeks after laundering, but where they wait during the cleaning, drying, pressing, hanging/folding process (the top of the dryer is only so big)
where clothes go once they’re cleaned or repaired – again, not the top of the dresser or hanging on the closet door; this location should be determined by the space allocation of your wardrobe and how you rotate your garments (most recently worn go in the back) or how you organize your clothing (such as by color or sleeve length) – the main point is to have a functional storage system and to avoid stuffing things into drawers or into the closet just to get everything put away
– where supplies for the process are kept – preferably, at the location where they are to be used, and in a location where they are easily viewed and accessed

+ Supplies & Equipment

– containers, kits, or stations where supplies are grouped and always kept – having your supplies grouped into kits will make them easier to find and use; having them stored in a container makes it easier to transport them to the precise task area where they’ll be used or to move them off a shelf when the need arises, such as for cleaning, taking inventory, or a dreaded plumbing leak
– stain treatment supplies – if you use a stain stick that can be applied days before being laundered, it may be useful to have multiple sticks and keep them at each location where dirty laundry is collected; these can also be good to have for travel
– laundry products – preferably, you can keep these to a minimum and avoid multiple opened products and almost-empty containers; if you have to take your laundry to another location to do your wash, having your products in a carrying container will make it that much easier to transport, and make you less likely to forget something
– sewing kit, buttons, etc. – everyone should be able to sew on a missing button, but you need to be able to find all the supplies you need to do this; keep buttons, needles, safety pins, several colors of thread, and a small pair of scissors in a small sealable container that you can easily find and take to a work space
– shoe polishing kit – a nice shoe polishing kit will greatly increase the likelihood that you will polish your shoes and get more life from them; this is an item that may be worth a little splurge – compared to the price of new shoes, the cost of a shoeshine kit could be a great value; make sure that you have polish colors that correspond to the shoes you own, and don’t forget to add white liquid polish to your kit if you need it for touching up your tennis shoes or summer sandals
– laundry processing equipment – this might include hampers, laundry baskets, laundry bags, drying racks, clothes hanging racks, clothes pins, ironing board & iron, hangers, or storage organizers; having the right tools for the job makes the task more pleasant

+ Space

– space for wardrobe maintenance items – not only do you need to have a designated location for collecting dirty laundry, you also need to have space for it; besides that, you may need baskets or containers for hand-washing & special treatment items, dry cleaning & repairs to be outsourced, items to donate or otherwise purge, and items needing do-it-yourself repairs (one more tip regarding laundry baskets & containers: rectangular-shaped containers are almost always better than round, or even elliptical-shaped)
– storage space for supplies & processing equipment – if you don’t have space and easy access to your cleaning & maintenance products and supplies, it’s not going to be fun; keep in mind the portability factor too, when thinking about your space and storage containers; and make it easy to put things away
– uncluttered flat surfaces – this is a tough one, because cleared flat surfaces tend to attract stuff galore, but you need such spaces for sorting, preparing, processing, pressing, folding, regrouping and reorganizing; so do your best to find some, even if it comes from a folding table
– a container for collecting pocket contents, lost buttons, etc. – you’ll probably want a container that has a sealable lid, so that you don’t end up with coins, buttons, and tokens spilled behind the washer and dryer; if you’re good, you’ll empty this collection container after each laundry event, but even if you’re not up to that level of efficiency, having a collection container can be an acceptable option and better than the alternative (setting coins and buttons on top of the washer or dryer where they inevitably will be knocked off into some place where they shouldn’t go)
– laundry sink or tub for pre-treating, soaking, hand-washing – granted, if you don’t have one of these, it’s hard to just create space for one, but you can put it on your wish list; and if you do have one, keep it clear of clutter and stocked with a scrub brush and other supplies you need to have on hand; an alternative to a sink or tub might be a plastic wash bin designated for that purpose
– space for air drying – this can be a clothesline (outside or inside), a drying rack, or a hanging device that’s used over your tub; just make sure that its accessible when you want to use it, and that it’s easily returned to its non-drying function when you’re finished (think retractable clotheslines and fold-up racks)
– space for processing cleaned clothes – this combines several previously mentioned elements, but I’m repeating it here because you need to have space (and maybe special racks) for hanging clean clothes, folding clothes, towels, & linens, sorting & stacking clean items, room to press garments that need ironing, and space to regroup and organize items that will be returned to different rooms (if you have to take your laundry out to be washed, you may need provisions for covering the clean items during transport)

+ Routine

– designate day(s) for laundry and wardrobe maintenance – laundry may be done weekly, but you can also integrate clothing repairs, shoe polishing, and other clothing maintenance tasks on this designated day; handling dry cleaning and other outsourced types of tasks can be relegated to days when you run errands
– frequency of laundering/cleaning – reassess how frequently you launder or dry clean your clothes – not how many times a week you do laundry, but how many hours you actually wear a garment before laundering it; if you put on an outfit at the end of the day to go out for the evening (and aren’t working up a sweat by dancing), perhaps you can wear it another time before washing it; be aware that over-washing and excessive dry cleaning can significantly shorten the wearability of a garment, not to mention the extra labor and resources it takes to do that extra cleaning
– share the labor – this point is especially directed at women, who typically take on the job of family launderer by default (and probably includes the wives of Stephen Covey and David Allen); don’t be a martyr and don’t encourage helplessness and dependency by taking on the entire household’s wardrobe maintenance; teach self-reliance by instructing children to maintain their own clothing. Release your care-giver instincts, lower your standards, and let them do it themselves! Household members should have individual responsibility for their own wardrobe items and bed clothes, and should share or rotate tasks for “community” laundry tasks (such as towels and linens).
– consider all-hands activities – engage the entire household for such things as hanger-gathering, quick & easy closet purges, donation gathering, shoe polishing night, curtain laundering, bed linen washing, and seasonal clothing transfers
– plan for complete follow-through of the process on laundry days – avoid musty or mildewy clothes forgotten in the washer, wrinkled clothes left in the dryer, and missing or disorganized clothing items that can’t be found because they were not put away; don’t start the process unless you know you’ll be able to follow it through to completion
– integrate a compatible activity with your laundry processing – make your laundry day more productive by integrating individual or family activities that can be done between the steps in the process; listed here are some examples of such activities:

  • exercise, walk, ride a bike, do yoga or a workout routine between loads
  • make it a cooking/baking day or prepare salad/vegetables for the week
  • read a book, magazine, or browse through a cookbook
  • listen to podcasts or audio books (or my favorite, This American Life)
  • dust bedroom furniture, baseboards, light fixtures, and clean mirrors, floors, door frames, and light switches
  • straighten up the closet, dresser drawers, night stands, and linen closet in preparation for clean laundry
  • write up plans for the week, update your calendar or address book, write e-mail messages or replies, write a few pages for your book/screenplay/business plan/blog
  • plan your menu for the week and write up a grocery list

– schedule an after-laundry activity – create a sense of urgency to get the task done, and provide something to look forward to (preferably, something that doesn’t involve everyone needing to shower first [you know, the hot water issue after laundering]; and maybe you should pass up an activity that involves spending or an eating-out activity – it would be good to get out of the habit of using these activities as a reward, for obvious reasons); listed below are some suggested alternatives:

  • go visit some friends or family (hello grandma!)
  • go to the park, pool, or playground; play tennis, kickball, ping-pong, or volleyball
  • set up a backyard game of croquet or badminton and have a cookout
  • go for a drive – just exploring or revisiting old neighborhoods or new sites
  • have dinner at home (maybe with food from the cooking/baking you did), then play a board game or do a family project or activity together

Bonus: Money-saving Aspect of Maintenance

Taking care of your wardrobe items is inherently a money-saving venture, but if you can make some adjustments in your maintenance system, you can save even more.

Save money by extending the life of your clothing. Extend the life of your clothing by
– making repairs & alterations needed to keep the garment functional
– reducing the frequency of laundering or dry cleaning
– reducing the wash and rinse temperatures
– eliminating or reducing the frequency of using heated drying
– reducing the amount of laundry detergent and fabric softeners used
– using a front-loading washer rather than a top-loading model, if you have the choice

Save money by eliminating or reducing the use of laundry products:
– fabric softeners, dryer sheets, anti-static products, and spray starch are products that are best used sparingly, if at all
– beside the cost of these products, fabric treatments affect the surfaces by making them slightly resistant to water, slightly glossy, and more difficult to clean (because of being impervious to water) if used routinely over an extended period of time
– be aware of the quantity of detergent you use, and adjust it for the amount of soil on the clothing and to minimize the soapiness that needs to be rinsed; many laundry detergents are now more concentrated, and suggested usage amounts tend to err on the side of using too much (which, from a marketing standpoint, will require you to buy more product more frequently); and don’t forget, the detergent and laundry products you use ultimately end up in the water supply system for treatment and redistribution, so be mindful and frugal with your usage – try reducing the amount you use until you find the minimal amount needed to do the job

Save big money by being selective about your home laundering methods:
– Remember that any kind of heat-generating equipment or appliances (stoves, ovens, toasters, water heaters, irons, clothes dryers, space heaters, furnaces, electric blankets, hair appliances, etc.) use more energy than almost any other type of energy usage in your house (way more than lighting or electronic devices), so any reduction you can make in your use of heat-generating appliances will result in significant savings
– Save $85-$150 per year in energy by air drying your clothes instead of using a gas or electric dryer
– Save $11-$226* per year in energy by reducing the use of heated water for washing and rinsing

And if you have the option, or are close to replacement of your appliances, keep these potential savings in mind:
– Save $28-$137* per year in water, detergent, and energy by using a front loading washer instead a top loading washer
– Save $12-$30* per year in energy with gas dryer instead of electric

*The figures I’ve cited are ranges derived from outstanding detailed information provided at Michael Bluejay’s site, Saving Electricity, which compares various factors of water and energy usage in the laundry process; it also compares other appliances and energy usage issues. If you appreciate excellent research and want to know specific information about appliances, energy usage costs, and efficiency, I would highly recommend his site. Take that, Stephen Covey and David Allen!)

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5 Ways “This American Life” Can Work For You – Act 5 – Create Your Life Soundtrack & Theme Song

Posted by denisefisher on February 6, 2009

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“From WBEZ Chicago and Public Radio International, it’s This American Life. I’m Ira Glass ….” Our program today – Life Needs A Soundtrack.

Last night, I was watching a PBS show, in which the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor was being awarded posthumously to George Carlin (who died in June 2008, only a week after learning that he would be receiving the honor). There was an all-star cast of fellow comedians featured, each of whom came on stage to tell their stories and memories of the honoree. As each guest star emerged from behind the curtains to make their presentation, the band played a musical introduction appropriate for the spotlighted comedian that was coming on stage. Several of the stars had easily recognizable theme songs from their TV shows – Rescue Me for Denis Leary, and The Daily Show theme song for Jon Stewart. But even for the stars who were without an associated TV show, there was a song chosen to identify them musically, in their entrance. When Lewis Black came on stage, the band played a rendition of the Rolling Stones’ Paint It Black. And though I didn’t recognize the song, by name, that was played for Joan Rivers’ entrance, it was a diva-like piece, reminiscent of music from the Jackie Gleason Show (if you’re old enough to remember it).

Each time I heard a new song, I thought to myself, “I want to have a recognizable theme song. I want to have a piece of music that is so closely associated with my identity that when people hear it, they think of me.” When you hear the tune Hail to the Chief, you know who is getting ready to enter the room. I want to experience that kind of musical recognition. Never mind that I don’t have the status or profile to elicit instant celebrity among the masses. That doesn’t mean I can’t have a theme song.

I have similar feelings about wanting a soundtrack for the stories in my life. A musical soundtrack adds depth, intensity, and purpose to whatever you’re doing. It inspires you to live life fully and snap out of that zombie/slacker fog. You can’t lounge around doing nothing when your soundtrack is playing in the background. That’s a call for action – the cameras are rolling – you’re on! Film makers understand this. The visual story is expanded to another dimension with the addition of a well-chosen soundtrack. The acting is more poignant, the adventure more vivid, and the emotions more engaging. Wouldn’t it be a much more exciting way to live you life?

Which brings me back to the stories on This American Life. As I previously mentioned, in the first post of this series, one of the coolest aspects of this program’s format is its musical interludes. Not only the music between the acts, but the strains that are strategically played in the background at just the right moments, or in between scenes to give you pause for reflection on what you just heard or to set the stage for what’s coming up.

Any one’s American Life would be enhanced by a soundtrack of that quality.

Pay close attention to the music that accompanies the stories of This American Life, and notice how it sets the tone and carries the theme of the show. Then start collecting the musical selections that you’d use to enhance your life story and the pursuits you engage in. The right mood music can give you the confidence you need to fill the role of motivated exercise person or personal planner.

Learn the subtle lesson that’s demonstrated each week on This American Life – that music can have a profound impact on the quality of your life. And a perfect theme song and soundtrack will motivate you to become the celebrity star of your own aspirations.

Bonus benefit: These episodes (and their associated musical interludes) are great to take with you, in portable format, for extended travels or long periods of waiting. They will keep you awake and alert during long drives home for the holidays, and you’re likely to arrive in a cheerful mood, rather than being stressed out. You probably won’t hear Hail to the Chief when you walk in the door, but you can play your appointed theme song on queue and plant the seed for future entrances.

Here are a few links to episodes with captivating themes and soundtracks, from the extensive archive collection at the This American Life website:

#339 Break Up

#166 Nobody’s Family Is Going To Change

#323 The Super

#341 How To Talk To Kids

#47 Christmas and Commerce

You can listen to the streaming version of the program for free. You can also download a free podcast of the program’s most recent broadcast. Downloads of previous episodes can be downloaded for a mere 95 cents each, and your purchase of these, as well as CDs and other merchandise available at the website helps to support the program. Of course you could also show your support by making a financial contribution. If you are as much an admirer of the show as I am, that’s what you’d do. I did.

Posted in Personal Style, Public Radio | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

5 Ways “This American Life” Can Work For You – Act 4 – Broaden Your Horizons

Posted by denisefisher on February 3, 2009

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You don’t usually think of a story-telling radio program as a source of knowledge for economics. But that’s one of the things that makes This American Life (TAL) so great. You might expect to hear stories of other cultures, far away places, and lifestyle adventures that are different than your own. But unless someone recommended a particular story to you and made it convenient for you to experience, you probably wouldn’t seek them out on your own. Well, I’m giving you my fervent recommendation, and TAL is delivering.

But don’t just think of this as an academic exercise. By listening to other viewpoints and hearing stories about things you weren’t aware of or never understood, you will broaden your horizons immensely. You’ll be more conversant and inquisitive with other people and more conscientious about world events that you hadn’t thought relevant to your own life.

Opening your mind to new ways of thinking will allow you to be more visionary in your outlook on life. It will cause you to think about your own financial situation, it will inspire you with novel ideas, and it will enlighten you with innovative solutions that you can apply to your own life’s circumstances.

And did I mention that these stories are entertaining?

Here is my recommended starter list for expanding your horizons, courtesy of This American Life:

#355 Giant Pool Of Money

#365 Another Frightening Show About The Economy

#206 Somewhere In The Arabian Sea

#293 A Little Bit Of Knowledge

#322 Shouting Across The Divide

#88 Numbers

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5 Ways “This American Life” Can Work For You – Act 3 – Motivation For Writing

Posted by denisefisher on February 2, 2009

clip_image002 It can be tough to shift gears, settle your mind, and sustain the focus needed for a writing project of any kind. This applies to more people than just journalists, authors, blog writers, and students. If you want to create a plan for your business, career, or personal goals, you’ll need to put something in writing. If you want to document family history or maintain a journal of your life story, you’ll need to quiet your mind and devote a chunk of uninterrupted time to this task. And you can’t just do it once. It takes repeated writing sessions to articulate ideas and bring a story to completion.

So many things around us stimulate the mind to race from one activity or attention-grabbing distraction to another. And the quiet, focused mindset that’s needed to write doesn’t come easily.

Enter the pre-writing exercise of listening to an episode of This American Life (TAL). This program is available through multiple media sources:

1. Your local public radio station (broadcast dates and time vary, so you’ll have to consult local programming guides)
2. Free downloaded podcasts (through iTunes or the TAL website)
3. Streaming audio you can listen to online while you’re connected to the internet
4. Purchased podcasts from the archives collection on the website
5. CDs of selected stories, available for purchase from the website’s store

While you listen to the show, through whatever means, you will find your mind calming and relaxing to the soothing voice of Ira Glass. Do not dilute this experience by trying to multi-task with other quick-paced activities. Something rhythmic, like knitting or shoe-polishing, would be ok, but stay away from large-muscle movements for these purposes.

You will find yourself engrossed in the stories you are listening to, yet, at the same time, your mind will start to engage in its own creative process. A similar thing happens when an amateur painter watches an admired artist at work on a canvas, or a casual musician sees a great performance with an instrument he plays himself. At some point, the observer experiences a compelling urge to become a creator, performer, or story teller.

You might not be able to restrain your urge to write until the end of the program, so have your writing tablet and implements, or your keyboard, within reach, even if it’s just to make notes. Then ride that wave of momentum and write for as long as you are able. You will feel such a sense of satisfaction with what you’ve done, and you’ll have a new option available to use when you’re struck with writer’s block or just a hectic lifestyle of distractions.

Here are some episodes that you may want to start with for this tip (I’ve included several suggestions, since you’ll need them for your many writing sessions):

#14 Accidental Documentaries

#314 It’s Never Over

#261 The Sanctity of Marriage

#167 Memo to the People of the Future

#174 Birthdays, Anniversaries, and Milestones

#114 Last Words

Posted in Public Radio, Routines, Time Management | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

5 Ways “This American Life” Can Work For You – Act 2 – The Ideal Task Timer

Posted by denisefisher on February 1, 2009

imageBecause the radio program, This American Life (TAL, for short), runs about 60 minutes (or slightly less), it’s a great way to keep track of time without having to watch the clock. You can start listening to an episode while you do whatever you need to do, and know that Ira Glass will give you timely prompts as he tells you what act in the sequence is coming up next. Pace yourself, and finish in about an hour.

Find the Time
If you search through the website, you can find many episodes with summaries that tell you how long each segment in the program lasts. Listen to the streaming podcast that corresponds with the number of tasks in your project and you’ll be able to move in rhythm to the show. If you’re undertaking a project that can be sub-divided into three or four steps, and you have selected a program with three or four acts, you will get an audible reminder when it’s time to move on to your next step.

One Major Task
If you have a single substantial task that you need to do, you can find an episode with a longer story in the middle. For example, listen to the episode titled, Welcome to America. There are three acts of various lengths – 5 minutes, then 31 minutes, then 15 minutes. Which gives you
5 minutes to get started
31 minutes to work on your task
15 minutes to wrap it up and put things away

Which makes TAL the ideal task timer.

The Clock is Ticking
If you’re just doing miscellaneous things (like sorting through the mail, putting away dishes, and straightening up around the house), but you don’t want to get carried away and forget to leave on time to pick someone up or keep with your next scheduled task, you might want to look for a differently timed program, like 20 Acts in 60 Minutes. The pace of that episode will keep you aware of the passing time, and it’s eventual conclusion.

Four Equal Tasks
Another timing strategy is to select a program with a more even division of its acts. You can reorganize four drawers in your dresser or clean out four designated shelves or compartments in your refrigerator while listening to the four-act episode of Office Politics. Its stories are 12, 15, 15, and 14 minutes long. Perfect for a project that can be divided into four segments of relatively equal time allotments.

More Ways to Use the TAL Task Timer with Your Appliances:

The Dryer
Start the show when you put your load into the dryer – you’ll have enough listening time to dry your clothes, with a timed reminder to get your clothes out and fold or hang them up. No annoying timer buzzer, and no ironing or a dryer re-fluff needed.

The Washer
For those with clotheslines and a portable way of listening … start the show as you load the clothes in the washer. Somewhere between the acts that are more than halfway through the program, the wash cycle will be completed. Then take your TAL program with you to listen to while you transfer your laundry to clotheslines or drying racks. No more forgotten laundry loads abandoned in the washer.

The Oven
Whether you’re baking whole wheat bread, a batch of brownies, a pan of lasagna, or a roasted entree that’ll provide several meals for the upcoming week, TAL is the perfect accompaniment. The built-in one-hour timer of the show will prompt you to keep the process moving and incite you to finish your clean-up before the program ends. You’d better be cleaning up when the final act begins.

I’m telling you, This American Life is the ideal task timer. You’ve got to try it. I’m recommending these programs for this tip:

#124 Welcome to America (5-31-15 minute acts)

#241 20 Acts in 60 Minutes (short stories in rapid-fire succession)

#208 Office Politics (12-15-15-14 minute acts)

Posted in Organization, Public Radio, Time Management | Tagged: , , , | 4 Comments »

5 Ways “This American Life” Can Work For You – Act 1 – Getting Projects Started

Posted by denisefisher on January 30, 2009

Listening to a show on the radio (and by radio, I mean Public Radio – the kind without commercial interruptions) has countless advantages over other types of entertainment. For one thing, it allows you to do other things while listening, so you can still be physically active and productive without diminishing the experience.

One of my favorite programs to listen to (and also one of the top [free] downloaded podcasts on iTunes each week) is This American Life, with host, Ira Glass. If you haven’t heard this program before, it might help to have a brief overview of its style and format.

On This American Life, each week they choose a theme and tell several stories on that theme over the span of an hour. The stories are often told in a mixed blend of interviews, recordings, and narrations by the authors. A really cool feature that defines the storytelling style of This American Life is the way that stories are interspersed with musical interludes.

For this series of posts, I’m enumerating five ways in which you can enjoy the program, This American Life, with additional benefits you may have never considered. Each of these listed benefits will include a suggested program that you can listen to by purchasing the podcast or listening to the streaming version of the show on the program’s website.

Getting Projects Started

When you’re facing a daunting project like sorting through an accumulation of mail and other papers, getting started on a painting project, reorganizing a storage space, or any other task that’s hard to get started, you can always count on This American Life to overcome your procrastination and make the chore more pleasant.

Before you set up your audio entertainment, gather everything you’ll need for the task. You don’t want to have to leave the earshot range of your speakers to fetch something in another room and risk missing a critical part of the story.

Make sure you have an uninterrupted hour in which to do your task, so that you will be able to listen to the entire program. Try to arrange it so that others will not disrupt you during your task, and consider turning off your phone (or at least allowing voice mail to take all but the most urgent of calls you can identify). If, perchance, you have longer than an hour to work on a project, you can always listen to an additional program of This American Life. The pause between the shows will give you a chance to make a pit stop or handle minor issues that require you to leave the area or divert your listening.

If you have not tried this technique before, you may be surprised at how easily you can get into a task that you might otherwise find grueling. Time will pass quickly, and you will be amazed at what you can accomplish while being entertained by Ira Glass and associates.

My program recommendations for this tip #1 would be either one (or both) of these two popular shows, both of which are based on real-life experiences:

#109 Notes on Camp

#352 The Ghost of Bobby Dunbar

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